MegsMakeup

The Original Beauty Blogger. Often imitated, never duplicated.

MARY-KATE AND ASHLEY EYESHADOWS! DRUGSTORE DEAL THURSDAYS!!

MARY-KATE AND ASHLEY EYESHADOWS! DRUGSTORE DEAL THURSDAYS!!

Cham3377 here to bring you glamor at a bargain price!

One of the songs I would choose to describe my life is Bryan Adams’ “18 ‘Till I Die.” Although I’m now considered middle-aged (Yikes! Did I just type that?), my mind is certain that I am still between the ages of sixteen and twenty. I enjoy all cosmetics, even those targeted for teenagers, and they often work well and can be purchased at more reasonable prices. Sheen is flattering for women of all ages, but careful application is crucial here. In general, less is more as you grow older. Luminous eyeshadow can transform your daily makeup into come-hither glamour. It enhances eyes when used on your brow bone or dabbed lightly in the center of your eye just above your pupil for a “wide-awake” look. Thus, when I heard Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen’s “Sequin Dust/Sparkling Powder” loose shadows screaming my name as I did my ritual “drugstore dance,” I had no choice but to buy. Hey, when makeup beckons, I obey! I’ve also seen them in dollar stores—the price is unbeatable. The hues offered? Sublime. The products? Disappointing at best.

I was tempted to buy all available shades but settled for four—“Buttercup” (a creamy, rich ecru), “Honey” (delicate taupe), “Sparkling Pink” (a unique blend of pink and lavender), and “Sparkling Sky” (subdued, attractive light blue). The first obstacle was the packaging. They come in a container much like a salt shaker. It’s necessary to puncture holes in the inner plastic lid where indicated and do a good bit of work to get the product out of the jar (a helpful exercise if you’re trying for Madonna-like muscled arms).

Several minutes later, I was finally able to try it. With makeup brush in hand (read: makeup brush, not sponge applicator), I covered my entire lid from lid to brow with the first two hues, testing each separately. It seemed these would serve as a wonderful, lustrous base. The gossamer effect was so extreme that it wasn’t even noticeable, as in eyeshadow, what eyeshadow? The only visible evidence of my using them were the sequin particles that adorned my face from my under eyes to chin. (Suggestion: to avoid this annoyance with any glitter shadows, gently hold a tissue under your eye and against your face while applying so that you don’t have to wash them away or redo makeup.)

All cosmetics are entitled to a fair trial and I decided to add water to intensify the pigment. At first I thought I had created the consummate foiled, holographic eye, but it dried with a cake-like texture. By the time I brushed away the crusty powder, the color disappeared again. Time to see what pink and blue would do . . .

These shades are even more difficult to shake out of the container. Though they are from the same line, the sequin particles are quite coarse and much larger–I looked garish, ready for a Halloween night out in my neighborhood. The lovely shades became invisible, overwhelmed by the particles. Water was no help in making them work. I appeared even more bizarre and clown-like. Mary-Kate and Ashley, these have potential—you’re great with colors, but please work on making them useable. My advice? Unless you’re preparing for your high school prom and are seeking all-out “look-at-me” drama or are Glinda from the Wizard of Oz, avoid, avoid. Pocket the change and treat yourself to lunch instead.

Any other thoughts on Mary Kate and Ashley Eyeshadow?

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